Gris

Review
83 Very Good
8 February
2019
Alaz Türker
Alaz Türker Editor
Gris
  • DeveloperDevolver Digital
  • PublisherDevolver Digital
  • MultiplayerNo
  • PlatformsNintendo Switch, PC
  • Review PlatformPC
Mimimum System Requirements
  • CPU: Intel Core2 Duo E6750 (2 * 2660) or equivalent / AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 5000 (2 * 2600) or equivalent
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • OS: Windows 7 or later
  • VIDEO CARD: Geforce GT 430 (1024 MB) / Radeon HD 5570 (1024 MB)
  • PIXEL SHADER: 5.0
  • VERTEX SHADER: 5.0
  • FREE DISK SPACE: 4 GB
  • DEDICATED VIDEO RAM: 1024 MB

Gris Review

There are always some games that appear plain and basic to us... however, they still manage to get the job done more than adequately. We can put Gris, the game we felt bonded to since start to finish in that same category.


Gris is a game l played with my full concentration, unable to focus on anything. But what is it that makes Gris so special? That's what we are going to be talking about in this review.

Gris Review

If you've played games in the style of Journey or Abzu before, l am sure you've more than well understood what l've said. Games like this are one with their art style, flowing like water, containing amazing virtuals that always touch your heart. Gris is no different.

Gris Review

You start the game without knowing anything about the world you've set upon. Gris, a fragile yet strong character starts your adventure about this curious world. With the ground collapsing just as you think you are on safe ground, you find yourself falling headfirst into the game itself. You feel as if you are smoothly gliding from start to finish. Gris doesn't have any big thunderstorms nor a story that will leave you enthralled however the journey combined with the game's art design provides you with a very rare experience.

We can summarize Gris simply by saying that it's a game that mixes platforming with basic puzzles. The puzzles are mostly easy and can occasionally make you wish it was harder however. The platforming aspects are generally jumping and overcoming or breaking obstacles. It's mostly distant from being a metroidvania and composed of many different map pieces. You don't explore the same areas over and over, instead encountering a layered format.


Of course, these aren't the only things that make Gris special. More accurately, there are tens or hundreds of games with these dynamics. The real gem that puts Gris among games like Journey and Abzu is the art style that it uses. The art and animation leave you in awe as you feel like you are living a storybook. It only grows more impressive as you progress through it, as if spraying new colors onto Bob Ross' canvas. After Journey, l have to admit that this is one of the games that affected me the most with it's masterful using of the camera. One moment it focuses on the character, the next it slaps you on the face with the reality that you are all alone in this huge world. It does this so perfectly that leaves you wondering what other views await you inside the game.

Gris Review

Another thing that affected me greatly is the music that complement the game. Don't ask ''How can a game be good without talking, explaining?'' It just happens. The music whispered into your ears as your character wanders through eternity captures the atmosphere perfectly. As you encounter a storm or make your way down a large mountain, the music gets more intense and provides you with the perfect tone necessary the whole game.

In conclusion, Gris is not a game that caters to all audiences, we must admit that. All l wrote for Gris will probably sound meaningless for those who are always after action. We must also say that the game is easy, short and occasionally repetitive. But in hindsight, even the parts that feel repetitive feel unique, as if you are flying through the air but every cloud has different shapes to them. Each new obstacle, puzzle you face are like spices to a tasteful dish. Ultimately, the meal ends fastly but leaves you very pleased and content.